Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Lime sherbet




While most of North America is slowly emerging from a polar vortex-induced hibernation, I'm the West Coast jerk jogging outside in shorts and writing about frozen desserts. If this is what climate change means for Vancouver, we're making off like bandits.

As it happens, this lime sherbet was inspired by another West Coaster: Tracy of Shutterbean.com and JtB podcast fame. Her tangerine sherbet had me craving an orange creamsicle something fierce, which got me thinking about this dreamy orange smoothie I used to drink in university, which got me thinking about the ham/apple/cheddar sandwich I used to order with it, which got me out the door and on the way to the grocery store for sandwich fixings.

Back in the kitchen, when the sandwich crumbs had settled, I realized I'd forgotten to pick up some tangerines. Lucky for me, a bit of fridge sleuthing uncovered a crisper full of neglected limes well past their prime and headed for a mid-life crisis. We all won in the end.

Lime sherbet
Having never made sherbet before, I stuck to the original Gourmet recipe quite closely. I did, however, play around with the butterfat of the milk and yogurt. What you see is what I used.
 
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 1/4 cups white sugar, split
1 1/2 cups 6% cream
1 large egg yolk
1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh lime zest
1/2 cup fresh lime juice (about 4 limes)
2 cups plain 2% yogurt

In a large saucepan, whisk together the cornstarch and 1 cup of sugar. Slowly whisk in the milk. Bring the mixture to a boil, whisking often, over medium heat. Then simmer, whisking occasionally, for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg yolk and remaining 1/4 cup of sugar. Add the hot milk in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly.

Transfer the mixture back to the large saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the mixture thickens and a thermometer reads degrees 77 degrees Celsius (170 degrees Fahrenheit). Don't let it boil!

Pour the custard—congratulations, you made custard!—into a clean, medium-sized bowl. Whisk in the lime zest, lime juice and yogurt. Chill the mixture until cold.

Process the mixture in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer's directions. Scoop the sherbet into an airtight storage container and freeze until firm (at least 4 hours).

Source: Lime-Yogurt Sherbet from Epicurious.com, originally published in Gourmet in May 2001.

3 comments:

kickpleat said...

I totally want a bowl of this right now! Looks zesty and perfect, so much so that I almost believe the sunshine that is streaming into our apartment is also accompanied by warm summer breezes!!

The Casual Baker said...

@kickpleat: And not the record-breaking -8 degrees Celsius that has me shivering in multiple pairs of socks.

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